A Saturday spent at Don Ho and Yayoi Kusama's Singapore Exhibition

Monday, 11 September 2017


On a bright Saturday morning, we did what most Singaporeans would do: Brunch!

In the sweltering Singapore heat, we made our way to Don Ho to try their latest Melbourne-inspired brunch offering a couple of weeks back.

Very quickly, here's what we had:

Hot smoked salmon ($20)
Brioche French Toast ($22)
The Don Ho ($18)
Flamingo Paradise ($12)
Latte ($5 - I forgot, estimating it out)


I've always loved Don Ho for their lovely decor. The cozy environment just makes you feel so at home, and at a classy one at that.

Did I also tell you before that many of my friends call this place the Flamingo place at Outram road? Because their signature wallpaper is filled with Flamingos! (on the side of Loloku, though, which shares their space and design)


Some of my friends think I'm crazy to order salmon early in the morning, but honestly, who can resist all that omega-3 and topped with a soft poached egg?


And because it's called The Don Ho, I reckon it's something you definitely have to order since they're confident enough to bestow the dish with the name of the restaurant. With a lovely fried sunny side up, candied maple bacon, grilled pineapple, pickled slaw and ranch dressing on their homemade bun, this delicious looking burger scored some good looking points from us.

On a side note, seriously, is their Brioche French Toast super pretty or what? Pink cream cheese? Send that to instagram! 



We also tried their Flamingo Paradise, an in-house smoothie made with strawberry, mango, banana, chia seed, fresh milk and coconut milk. We loved this!




Thanks Don Ho for the invitation.


DON HO - SOCIAL KITCHEN & BAR
Location: 1 Keong Saik Road, 089109 Singapore
Website: https://www.don-ho.com
Tel: +65 6223 5001

Next up, we head to check out Yayoi Kusama's exhibition at the National Gallery Singapore!

Description extract from National Gallery's webstie: 
"Yayoi Kusama is one of the world’s most influential artists, and has played a crucial role in key art movements of the 20th and 21st centuries. The first major survey of her work in Southeast Asia, this exhibition focuses on the immersive and expansive nature of her practice. Discover Kusama’s creative vision through paintings, sculptures, videos and installations from the 1950s to the present, including works never shown before. Step into her infinity mirror rooms, explore the development of her intricate nets, dots and pumpkin motifs, and encounter new paintings in which the artist continues to push artistic boundaries."

It's really not hard to tell that you're in Singapore when there are queues everywhere. I queued about 40 minutes before being able to get my tickets, then queued to enter every exhibition. Especially the infinity mirror room, which was an extremely small space and the ushers stuck 4 people in for 20 secs. The strangers appeared in all my shots, and I was a sad puppy. (I love people, but don't we all love single, instagrammable shots?!)


Classic Kusama for you - the dotted pumpkin.


If I can share abit of my thoughts, I just think she is extremely a troubled individual. From her weird song (which they played the video of her singing a song with eyes that seemed totally detached from the face of this earth) to her extremely troubling sexual sculptures, I was really uncomfortable with anything she created which was 'un-dotty'.

Because I felt that it was a deeper view into her mind, that part scared me quite a bit because by the end of the exhibition I really deeply felt what a troubled, disturbed life she led and I felt quite sad for her.

Haters gonna hate, but those are my two cents.



I was still more comfortable just seeing her dotty art. To me, despite her troubled past reflected in her dotty works, it still felt like it was therapeutic for her and that makes me feel like at least she found solace in something. Her dotty works seems to speak of the consistency she yearned in life, and the desire to fill up her life with the repetition through those dots and lack of much empty space seems to be a reflection of her dislike of having anymore emptiness in her life. Again, just my two cents.




Anyhoo, I'm glad I visited her exhibition before it ended on 3 Sept 2017, because now I felt like at least I've seen and understood more about this artist I've known and heard about since a long long time ago. :)

National Gallery Singapore
Location: 1 St. Andrew's Road, Singapore 178957
Website: https://www.nationalgallery.sg/
Opening Hours: Sun - Thurs & Public Holidays - 10am to 7pm / Fri - Sat & Eves of Public Holidays - 10am to 10pm

If you liked this post, please show some support here by showing some love here, click 'Like' for my FB Page!: